Omvärlden

Colombia: Imagine if we could go back to the future

Article published in Omvärlden
2 September 2019
By Gerald Bermudez

“Three years ago I was working on a book of photographs about the peace negotiations between the Colombian government and the left-wing FARC guerrillas. I dedicated the book to my six-year-old son because I saw a possibility that he wouldn’t have to grow up with fear as his constant companion. ”

Full article (in Swedish) here:
https://www.omvarlden.se/Opinion/kronikor1/colombia-tank-om-vi-kunde-aka-tillbaka-till-framtiden/

Haiti: ‘My success belongs to my parents and siblings’

Article published in Omvärlden
6 August 2019
By Ralph Thomassaint-Joseph

Widlore Mérancourt  lives a privileged life in Haiti. But on his shoulders rests the responsibility for nine family members, and his greatest fear is that something will happen to him – something that would throw him back into the poverty of his past.

‘I’m 27 this year but can’t plan anything for my own life. With the responsibility for an entire family it is impossible to think about the future. My parents always told me they invested in me so that I would be able to help my brothers and sisters. So I grew up knowing that my success in life belongs to my parents and siblings.'”

Full article (in Swedish) here:
https://www.omvarlden.se/Intervju/intervjuer-2019/haiti-min-framgang-tillhor-mina-foraldrar-och-syskon/

Colombia: The taste of poverty

Article published in Omvärlden
6 August 2019
By Gerald Bermudez

When Diana Gordillo tastes a slice of mortadella sausage, she experiences the same feelings of luxury that she did as a hunger-stricken child. But for most well-off Colombians mortadella is still associated with poverty.

“People in the middle-class, which is where I now find myself, find foods popular with poor people repulsive,” she says. “In order not to seem different I usually say I don’t like mortadella, even though I actually love it!

“In the nice public school where I work, a colleague turned down guava juice because she said it tastes of poverty. This made me uncomfortable and sad – so many people deny their background, even though a big portion of Colombia’s middle-class grew up under much simper circumstances.'”

Full article (in Swedish) here: https://www.omvarlden.se/Intervju/intervjuer-2019/colombia-smaken-av-fattigdom/

People think I should be more authoritative towards my wife

Article published in Omvärlden
23 November 2016
By Rahmina Gambo

Nigeria. 47-year old Samuel Oruruo likes to cook and does not boss his wife around, something that has made many people in his surroundings question his manliness. The patriarchal structures in Nigeria are strong, but things are starting to change, he says.

“I was raised differently from how most Nigerian men are raised. I have five brothers and four sisters, and my mother didn’t treat us differently when it came to household chores; on the contrary she pushed me and my brothers to cook and clean.
In those days I didn’t understand why my mother would do that. I hated household chores, I wanted to hang out with my friends. But with time, I’ve come to realise that she wanted us to grow up to become responsible and capable of doing everything, regardless of our gender.”

Samuel says that when he got married, his in-laws and other relatives thought that he was not masculine enough, as he was not opposed to household chores. It is often women who are his loudest critics, he adds.

Full article (in Swedish) here: http://www.omvarlden.se/Opinion/kronikor1/manga-tycker-att-jag-borde-vara-mer-auktoritar-mot-min-fru/

I encourage men to buy sanitary pads for their sisters

Article published in Omvärlden
22 November 2016
By Bhrikuti Rai
Photos: Bikram Rai

Nepal. Sabin Singh tries to break old patriarchal patterns by talking to boys and men about menstruation. Women who menstruate are often seen as unclean, and in more traditional areas they can be forced to sleep in cow manure, he says.

“I was first introduced to ideas that question traditional gender roles in Nepal when I was a teenager. In an after school club in the neighbourhood, games were based on themes related to gender roles and the importance of gender equality. Since then, I’ve participated in several programs and projects that aim to encourage gender equality at home and at the workplace. Currently I’m working with the popular Nepalese radio show ‘Saathi Sanga Manka Kura’ (in English: ‘Chatting to my best friend’) which discusses topics about growing up and becoming an adult. Gender roles is a recurring theme.”

Full article (in Swedish) here: http://www.omvarlden.se/Opinion/kronikor1/jag-uppmanar-man-att-kopa-bindor-till-sina-systrar/

A macho man is like an alcoholic

Article published in OmVärlden
21 November 2016
By Álex Ayala Ugarte
Photos: Patricio Crooker

Bolivia. Javier Badani Ruz, 41, grew up in a traditional family and was raised with macho ideas of what a man is supposed to be like. A new job and the birth of his daughters changed everything. But taking off the macho mask is like living like a sober alcoholic, he tells journalist Álex Ayala Ugarte.

“A macho man, to me, is like an alcoholic: He can recover but only if he is capable of becoming aware of his illness. For many years, I had macho traits, and it was like it was in my genes. My dad was a Don Juan his entire life. My mother comes from a very traditional family and took care of everything when I was little: She tidied my room, gave me breakfast in bed, ironed my clothes and really spoiled me.”

Full article (in Swedish) here: http://www.omvarlden.se/Opinion/kronikor1/en-machoman-ar-som-en-alkoholist/

 

Zimbabwe’s youth has had enough

Article published in OmVärlden
11 October 2016
By Thelma Chikwanha
Photos: Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi

Zimbabwe. The older generation has let the younger one down. Now young people are protesting in the streets and on social media to express their frustration with Robert Mugabe’s government. Widespread corruption is one of the reasons – it was recently established that diamond revenue worth £1,5 billion has just disappeared.

For the last three months different movements of upset citizens are protesting in Zimbabwe. The protests started after the young pastor Evan Mawarire’s social media post was shared across the country. Using the hashtag #ThisFlag, he encouraged Zimbabweans to hold the government responsible for the collapsed economy.

Full article (in Swedish) here: https://www.omvarlden.se/Branschnytt/nyheter-2016/zimbabwes-unga-har-fatt-nog/