Category Archives: Haiti

Postcard from Haiti

Motorbikes and cars waiting in long queues for increasingly scarce petrol have become a common sight in Port-au-Prince in recent weeks. Hundreds of vendors approach waiting vehicles with yellow petrol cans. Fights sometimes break out over who gets to sell or buy first.

This fuel crisis is damaging the  economy. Thousands of children can’t get to school, many employees fail to get to work and businesses are badly hit:  “Our clients can’t get anywhere and sales are down in all sectors”, complains businessman Réginald Boulos.

He and many others are forced to turn to the black market, where  a gallon of petrol sells for 500 gourdes (about US$5.9), or about 250 per cent  more than the price at the pump – if the pump wasn’t empty. 

Haiti has stopped receiving cheap oil from Venezuela, which is struggling with its own economic and political crisis. To make matters worse,  a waiting oil tanker has refused to unload until the government pays some of the US$60 million owed for previous deliveries.

Fuel price increases affect almost all Haitians and it feels as though the country could erupt at any moment.

/Ralph Thomassaint Joseph, Port-au-Prince

The postcards written by journalists in our network are published on the Blankspot Project website.

Postcard from Haiti

With its shanty towns and unplanned growth, Port-au-Prince gives a chaotic impression. The lack of urban planning is one of the city’s major flaws.

That’s why the theme for the Haitian and foreign artists taking part in the third graffiti festival Festi-Graffiti was “The resurrection of the public space”.

In Haiti, graffiti mainly expresses political views. During the dictatorship in 1957-1986, the lack of freedom of speech made graffiti a way of shocking those in power and criticising society – a tradition that is still alive, especially during elections.

Some artists in the graffiti festival highlighted the recent and increasingly loud demand for transparency in government spending. But above all, the artists were given the opportunity of conveying their aesthetic visions for the city.

“We want to turn graffiti into an art form just like any other, and show that it’s about more than just criticising or flattering politicians”, said Widler Resonance, chairman of the collective for urban and modern art.

/Ralph Thomassaint Joseph, Port au Prince..

The Postcards from journalists in our network are published on the Blankspot  website.