Egypt

Egyptian women have had enough of sexual harassment

Article published in Göteborgsposten
29 January 2017
By Nesma Nowar
Photos: Heba Adel

Egypt. A study made by UN Women and Egypt’s National Council for Women in 2013 showed that 99,3 percent of women have experienced some sort of sexual harassment in public places.

Sarah Salah, a 19-year old student, says that she daily gets sexually harassed, either on public transport or on her walk from the bus station to the university.
“I can’t handle this daily stress anymore”, she says. “It’s common that men on the crowded bus use the lack of space as an excuse to shamelessly touch intimate parts of my body.”

Sarah is scared to tell her parents about her experiences because she is worried they would stop her from going to University. Although sexual harassment happens to women across the Egyptian society, those on a lower income are more vulnerable because they rely on public transport.

“These women are often forced to stay at home because the family sees it as a way of protecting them”, says Nevine Ebeid from the women’s rights organisation New Woman Foundation. “The message from society is that women have no place in the public realm.”

Full article (in Swedish) here:
http://www.gp.se/nyheter/v%C3%A4rlden/egyptiska-kvinnor-har-tr%C3%B6ttnat-p%C3%A5-sexofredande-1.4134600

The hope of freedom has turned into anger and disappointment

Article published in Svenska Dagbladet
2 October 2016
By Shahira Amin
Photos: Eman Helal

Egypt. More than five years have passed since president Mubarak was unseated in Egypt. There was hope that the revolution would lead to much wanted reforms, but today the Egyptians are as far away from democracy as they were when they took to the streets in 2011.

Today, Tahrir square – once the symbol of the Egyptian revolution – has few similarities with the public space that was occupied by tens of thousands of democracy activists in the beginning of 2011.

The hope and optimism then felt has been replaced by anger and discontentment from unfulfilled expectations. Since the unseating of the president Mohamed Morsi 2013, supported by the military, society is deeply polarised. Tens of thousands of the leaders and supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood are imprisoned.

Full article (in Swedish) here: https://www.svd.se/fem-ar-efter-mubarak–langt-till-frihet-och-demokrati/om/varlden

Six have been killed since the fall of Mubarak

Article published in Journalisten
22 December 2015
By Shahira Amin

Egypt. For many years, Shahira Amin worked as a news anchor and reporter for the English speaking public service channel. When the protests came in 2011, she resigned.

“For the first time in my 30 year long career I felt truly free.”

Full article (in Swedish) here: http://www.journalisten.se/kronika/sex-har-dodats-sedan-mubaraks-fall